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FISH

We are focusing on international commerce of food products. Our global and local partnerships help us keep one step ahead of the market and provide a competitive product portfoli.

We are committed to satisfy the broadest and most varied demands of the international market.
We also have strategic partners in the main world markets, such as the United States, Russia, Africa and the European Union.

 

 
About the Species

U.S. wild-caught Pacific mackerel is a smart seafood choice because it is sustainably managed and responsibly harvested under U.S. regulations.

Status
  • According to the 2017 stock assessment, Pacific mackerel are not overfished and are not subject to overfishing.
  • Pacific mackerel naturally experience “boom and bust” cycles of abundance, which is typical of other small pelagic species that have relatively short life spans and high reproduction rates.
  • The Pacific mackerel stock is well above its target population level. However, in historical terms, the population remains at a relatively low abundance level, due primarily to oceanographic conditions.
  • Appearance
    • The body of the Pacific mackerel tapers at both ends.
    • They have a pointy head and a large mouth.
    • The head is dark blue, the back is dark blue with about 30 dark wavy lines, and the undersides are silver green.
    • Pacific mackerel can be distinguished from other mackerel by counting the finlets on their back; Pacific mackerel typically have four to six finlets.
    • Where They Live
      • Pacific mackerel are found from southeastern Alaska to Mexico but are most common south of Point Conception, California.

 

About the Species

U.S. wild-caught silver hake is a smart seafood choice because it is sustainably managed and responsibly harvested under U.S. regulations.

Status
  • According to the 2017 stock assessment, Gulf of Maine and Northern Georges Bank (northern stock) and Southern Georges Bank and Mid-Atlantic (southern stock) silver hake are not overfished and are not subject to overfishing.
Appearance
  • Silver hake are silvery in color, brownish on the back and whitish on the belly, with black speckles on the back and black inside the mouth.
  • They have large heads for their size and sharp teeth.
  • They have long pectoral fins and are fast swimmers.
  • Where They Live
    • Silver hake are found in the Northwest Atlantic Ocean and range primarily from Newfoundland to South Carolina.

 

 

 

ATLANTIC MACKEREL

PACIFIC MACKEREL

 

SILVER HAKE

 

 

ATLANTIC HERRING

 

 
 
About the Species

U.S. wild-caught Atlantic mackerel is a smart seafood choice because it is sustainably managed and responsibly harvested under U.S. regulations.

Status
  • According to the 2018 stock assessment, Atlantic mackerel are overfished, and are subject to overfishing.
  • Atlantic mackerel previously had an unknown status, but the 2018 stock assessment indicated the stock has been overfished for nearly a decade.
Appearance
  • Atlantic mackerel are iridescent blue green on the back with a silvery white underbelly.
  • They have 20 to 30 wavy black bars that run across the top half of their body, and a narrow dark streak that runs below these bars along each side.
  • Their body is spindle-shaped, tapering at both ends.
  • Their two large dorsal fins are gray or dusky. The pectoral fins are black or dusky at the base, and the tail fin is gray or dusky.
  • Their distinctive coloring fades quickly after they die.
Where They Live
  • Atlantic mackerel are found on both sides of the North Atlantic Ocean, including in the Baltic Sea. In the western Atlantic, they’re found from Labrador to North Carolina.

 

About the Species

U.S. wild-caught Atlantic herring is a smart seafood choice because it is sustainably managed and responsibly harvested under U.S. regulations.

Status
  • According to the 2015 stock assessment, Atlantic herring are not overfished and are not subject to overfishing.
  • In that assessment scientists used spawning stock biomass (the amount of fish in the population capable of reproducing) to estimate the Atlantic herring population at 517,930 metric tons, which is well above the target level of 157,000 metric tons.
  • Herring populations are naturally highly variable.
Appearance
  • Atlantic herring are small schooling fish.
  • They are silvery in color, with a bluish or greenish-blue back.
Where They Live
  • Atlantic herring are found on both sides of the North Atlantic. In the western North Atlantic, they are found from Labrador to Cape Hatteras, North Carolina.